Design is an imprecise term. Especially when used in regular language.

For instance, someone who believes "design" is quantified solely by a product’s visual appeal might be disappointed when they get a set of gray boxes and lines — a wireframe — as a deliverable created by a talented designer.


Starting with just a simple line of code 11 years ago, WordPress has evolved to become the platform of more than 74 million websites.

Even with a vast array of competitors offering similar functionality, WordPress still dominates the CMS market with a 21.9% market share.


With more and more technology companies adopting remote working environments, having team members in different parts of the world is not uncommon any more.

Remote working comes with many benefits, but also unique challenges.


A wireframe is not the same as a prototype but even seasoned design professionals can sometimes get the two terms mixed up.

It’s time to set things straight once and for all, since (semantics aside) the difference between a wireframe and a prototype is actually quite substantial.


CSS3 gives designers many new properties and modules (like the CSS Animations and CSS Transitions modules) that allow them to add fascinating interactivity onto their work.

If you want to take advantage of these modern CSS capabilities, one quick way to do that would be to use (or study) CSS effects libraries. Let me talk about a few open source collections of CSS that will help you craft great transitional interfaces.


Mainstream blogging platforms like WordPress, Blogger, Tumblr, etc. aren’t designed for hackers. They’re encumbered by features developers just don’t need or want.

And, out of the box, the popular blogging platforms certainly lack a lot things coders actually would want, such as code syntax highlighting, blog theming capabilities using a standardized templating engine, markup language support besides HTML, and integration with source code repositories, among other things.


It’s reasonable to assume that a website’s loading time is important.

We can confidently conclude that slow sites have usability and SEO issues because we know that users hate waiting for web pages to load and that Google uses site speed as a factor for its search rankings.

But, quantitatively, what are the other effects of having a slow website?

Let us look at some cases of tech companies sharing what they have learned about web optimization.