CSS3 Card Trick: A Fun CSS3 Experiment

Sep 6 2010 by Alexander Dawson | 11 Comments

This tutorial is based on a simple animated experiment that showcases just one of the amazing things you can create using CSS. I’ve used no images and no scripting; everything’s done using HTML and CSS.

It goes without saying that since CSS3 is still not supported by all browsers, it might not work as intended; but I’ve coded this in such a way that it will degrade gracefully on non-CSS3 browsers, including IE (of course).

continue reading »

3 Advanced CSS3 Techniques You Should Learn

Aug 15 2010 by Max Luzuriaga | 30 Comments

3 Advanced CSS3 Techniques You Should Learn

If you’re reading this, then I can safely assume that you’ve at least heard of CSS3. The latest version of CSS includes properties that allow you to style your HTML elements with rounded corners, drop shadows, and even color gradients.

However, these techniques just scratch the surface of what CSS3 can really do. In this guide, I am going to be talking about three advanced CSS3 techniques.

continue reading »

10 Interesting CSS3 Experiments and Demos

Jul 25 2010 by Jacob Gube | 15 Comments

10 Interesting CSS3 Experiments and Demos

You’ve heard it plenty of times before: We’re at the precipice of a transition in the way we, as developers, do things. Leading the way are future standards like CSS3 and HTML5, both already partially implemented in 4 out of the 5 major web browsers, with IE9 promising support, empowering us with new ways of making interactive and rich user experiences.

Just how awesome is CSS3? Find out by checking out these 10 experiments and demos that push the capabilities of the specs.

continue reading »

Create a CSS3 Call to Action Button

Jul 6 2010 by Andrew Roberts | 34 Comments

Create a CSS3 Call to Action Button

Continuing on with my previous article showing the power of CSS3 for web designers, I’m now going to share with you a method for making a slick call to action button using only CSS.

Like the last article, I’m going to take a previous Photoshop tutorial called How to Create a Slick and Clean Button in Photoshop by Six Revisions Chief Editor, Jacob Gube, and try my best to recreate it without using a graphics editor. I think doing this is one of the best ways to highlight the fact that CSS3 can make our jobs as web designers much easier.

continue reading »

Saving Bandwidth and Improving Site Speed Using CSS Sprites

Jul 3 2010 by Peter Richards | 40 Comments

Saving Bandwidth and Improving Site Speed Using CSS Spites

As a site owner, possibly the worst experience that you could serve upon your visitors is a frustrating wait whilst the clock spins and the page loads. In most cases, most of your potential customers would have pressed the back button in their browser and headed off somewhere else; this inevitably means a loss of potential business.

Site speed is predicted to become one of Google’s next ranking factors, although as per normal, the company tends to keep the nitty-gritty close to its chest.

continue reading »

Sexy Tooltips with Just CSS

Jun 16 2010 by Alexander Dawson | 117 Comments

Sexy Tooltips with Just CSS

Providing supplementary information about potentially complex elements of a user interface is a central part of any website designer or developer’s workflow in creating usable and accessible websites.

One of the most common mechanisms for providing extra details beyond what you can see on the page is the tooltip (a design pattern for showing tips about a particular element on a screen).

continue reading »

The Essential Guide to @font-face

Jun 8 2010 by Joshua Johnson | 98 Comments

The Essential Guide to @font-face

Fonts on the Web

The days of being limited to a handful of fonts on the web are very close to being a thing of the past. The problem is no longer a lack of viable solutions, but rather, an abundance of them.

Technologies like Cufon, sIFR, FLIR and @font-face all represent different groups of developers placing bets on what they believe to be the future of web typography.

There is, as of yet, no consensus in this ever-evolving game. All of these methods have perfectly valid arguments both for and against their use.

Further, even the most popular browsers support each of these technologies in widely varying degrees.

continue reading »