10 Tips for Optimizing Web Form Submission Usability

Jan 7 2011 by Raphael Caixeta | 40 Comments

10 Tips for Optimizing Web Form Submission Usability

Web forms play a big part in every day web use. If you build and/or run websites, chances are, you have a web form in it, whether it’s a simple contact form or a rich and robust web app. There are several ways to make sure your web forms are optimized for your users. Here are some tips for making sure that your form submission process is user-friendly.

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Stop the FAQ Page Bandage

Nov 19 2010 by Jason Gross | 14 Comments

Stop the FAQ Page Bandage

The evolution of the web and the way in which we design for it has brought around all kinds of patterns, standards and best practices. Sites have a relatively uniform information structure: We always start with a home page (also known as the front page or index page) as the default page, and we’ll have common pages such as a contact page, an about page, and so forth.

A lot of sites will have a web page dedicated to problem-solving, giving answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ). In a time where interactivity between the site operator and site visitors is at the forefront, and a time where site analytics allow us to know more about user behavior than ever before — has the FAQ page, been left behind?

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Ultimate Guide to Website Wireframing

Nov 1 2010 by Cameron Chapman | 95 Comments

Ultimate Guide to Website Wireframing

Most designers wireframe their designs in one way or another, even if it just involves them making quick sketches on the back of some scratch paper. Wireframing is an important part of the design process, especially for more complex projects.

Wireframes can come in handy when you’re communicating with clients, as it allows them to visualize your ideas more easily than when you just describe them verbally.

This guide covers what you need to know about website wireframes to get started.

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Basic Tips for Designing a Quote Request Web Form

Oct 28 2010 by Brian Casel | 21 Comments

Basic Tips for Designing a Quote Request Web Form

Whether you’re a solo freelancer or the head of a huge web design agency (or somewhere in between), your website often serves as the first point of contact with a potential new client. Displaying an impressive portfolio of work along with a few client testimonials is a great start. But the final piece is key: Your contact form, or as many call it, the "Request a Quote" form, also known as Request for Quotation (RFQ) form or Request for Proposal (RFP) form.

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Important Features All Blogs Should Really Have

Oct 13 2010 by Jake Rocheleau | 21 Comments

Important Features All Blogs Should Really Have

Blogging is more commonplace now than ever before. It’s estimated that there are at least 147 million blogs[1] covering topics from technology to Japanese theme restaurants.

But regardless of the vastness of the blogosphere and the diversity of blog topics, there are a handful of site features that you’ll likely find in most of them. In addition, readers have come to expect these site features to be available to them when they visit their favorite blogs.

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How Fun is Your Website?

Oct 1 2010 by Jason Gross | 9 Comments

How Fun is Your Website?

The secret to success for a website these days is really no secret at all. Websites that really bring home the bacon are the ones driven by loyal visitors who frequent the site on a regular basis. Building a community like this often takes a lot of time and loads of great content.

But is there a way to shortcut the tried and true methods of great material and great marketing?

What if a website were fun to play?

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Creating a User Interface That Speaks Your Users’ Language

Sep 27 2010 by Cedric Savarese | 11 Comments

Creating a User Interface That Speaks Your Users' Language

In this article, we’ll talk about the challenges of writing concise and familiar copy for web application user interfaces.  We’ll illustrate, with a real case example, how tools like Amazon’s Mechanical Turk can help designers find a common language with their users.

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