Best Relational Database Management System?

Nov 23 2009 by Jacob Gube | 291 Comments

Relational database management systems (RDMS) such as SQL Server, MySQL, Postgre SQL, and Oracle (just to name a few) have allowed web developers to create highly interactive and robust web applications that can save data.

Best Relational Database Management System?

Participation on the Giveaway has now ended. Stay tuned for results.

Navicat and Six Revisions would like to know what you think the best relational database management system is, and to make things more fun, Navicat has decided to offer up over $1,000 dollars worth of prizes to randomly selected participants.

This giveaway is to celebrate of Navicat’s newly released enterprise-level Navicat Premium line of database management tools that is an all-in-one admin tool for MySQL, Postgre SQL, and Oracle.

The Prizes

Three licenses of Navicat Premium will be given away to participants of this giveaway.

Here are the prizes:

  • Navicat Premium (Windows) – value: $369
  • Navicat Premium (Mac OS X) -value: $319
  • Navicat Premium (Linux) – value: $319

How to Participate

Simply vote for what you think the best relational database management system (see a list of RDMS on Wikipedia) in the comments is using the format below:

Vote: name of best relational database management system

Giveaway details

The giveaway ends on November 30, 2009 after which the commenting system on this post will be disabled. You may only vote once. You should use a valid email address when filling out the comment web form so that you can be notified if you’ve won.

An exclusive Six Revisions discount!

You can get 10% off the sale price of a Navicat product simply by using the following code:

sixre20

This code will be valid until December 21, 2009.

About Navicat

Navicat is a leading administration and development tool for MySQL, Oracle and PostgreSQL which features an intuitive interface and provides a set of useful tool to manage, backup/ restore, import/ export data, create report, synchronize database and connect to remote database server, etc. Also, Navicat provides a number of tools allowing to perform all the necessary database operations such as creating, editing, and duplicating database objects. Learn more about Navicat’s major features.

Related Content

About the Author

Jacob Gube is the Founder and Chief Editor of Six Revisions. He’s also a web developer/designer who specializes in front-end development (JavaScript, HTML, CSS) and PHP development. If you’d like to connect with him, head on over to the contact page and follow him on Twitter: @sixrevisions.

291 Comments

Sakesun

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Oracle

ron

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: mysql

Mihai Lazar

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server

Cam

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Ole

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Daniel Silveira

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server

Praveen

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

dizzl

November 23rd, 2009

vote: SQLite

lossendae

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Dylan Parry

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MS SQL Server

Depends really on the platform though. I’d go with MS every time if on Windows and using ASP/.Net, but for PHP I’d say Postgre SQL is a good choice. MySQL, though prevalent, is lacking in features. And finally Oracle, whilst feature-rich, is overly complicated and far too expensive.

Nasim

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Shaun

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Mark O'Grady

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server 2008

Amr ElGarhy

November 23rd, 2009

I think Oracle is the best and all others are very near from each other.

Richard Tector

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Jon Acedo

November 23rd, 2009

vote: MySQL

Bruno

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

webbografico

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

ps: i’m on OSX

webmasterdubai

November 23rd, 2009

i really love navicat with mysql and im using it from last 3 years please select me for this giveaway

Don

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Oracle

Peter

November 23rd, 2009

VOTE: PostgreSQL

Sebastian

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

copy112

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: mySQL

HerrH

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

But: it really depends on the project :) Sometimes it’s just better to use PostgreSQL i.e. if you have huge datasets like ip-ranges or firewall rules.

Luca B.

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

karmaredux

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Devwi

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Noel

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Tom

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server

Anthony

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server

Mike

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Katharine

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSql

Vinod Kumar

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server

Rafael Barbosa

November 23rd, 2009

Oracle DB 11

Ed

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Rafael Barbosa

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Oracle DB 11

Noel

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Microsoft SQL Server

Richard Fleming

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Oracle

mdomba

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Andrew Johnson

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Siwongo

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Oracle

Steve Robillard

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: mysql

Having said thayt it depends on the application, platform, requirements, user base and many more criteria.

Reiza

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Arabinda

November 23rd, 2009

MS SQL Server

Dan Danciu

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Skofo

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Drizzle

The Other Don

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MS SQL Server 2008

Freedog96150

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Russbuelt

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Oracle

knico

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

rizza

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Smuliii

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Dave

November 23rd, 2009

I’m MySQL, never used anything else

Tim

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Shachiel

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Keep it up for Open Source!

qcz

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Alexis

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MS SQL Server

Shaun

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Wim

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Joe

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Matt

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Matthew Heidenreich

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Ionut

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Arne

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

nick

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Vanco

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: DB2

Masaood

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Oracle

Allan Mullan

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Handrus

November 23rd, 2009

PostgreSQL

Shiaw Uen

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Marco

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Thad

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Indra

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Raithlin

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Nec

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Adam

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

z

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Abel Pita

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server

Glenn

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server

James

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Dennis

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Eric Cope

November 23rd, 2009

I use MySQL, but would love Oracle.

Will Jones

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MYSQL

The best things in life are free!!!

Maxx

November 23rd, 2009

As with any “best of” question, the answer is determined by the task being performed. For low cost and usability it is hard to beat MySQL. For mission critical enterprise applications such as CRM, HR, or financial applications, Oracle is a very strong contender. ECommerce and collaborative applications that need to work with the Microsoft Office suite of tools fare best with MS SQL. Postgress SQL is a great database engine as well.

Personally, I know MS SQL Server better than any of the others and make my living as a DBA supporting that product. So, for providing my livelihood alone I vote for MS SQL Server. (Although, every web site that I manage and most of my private development projects are on MySQL.)

Allen

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Ronny

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

FuZZ

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

qim

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Travis Spencer

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MS SQL

Brandon

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: SQL Server

MariusRugan

November 23rd, 2009

MySQL

Doug Stewart

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL.

Hands-down.

Andy

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

NiGHTkid83

November 23rd, 2009

vote: MySQL

HerbHeart

November 23rd, 2009

vote PostgreSQL

HerbHeart

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

ZaF

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Paul C

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL
… though it depends on your needs. I haven’t used Oracle but I heard it can do lots of things better than MySQL (if MySQL can even do them). However, for Web Development, MySQL’s usually good enough.

Fish

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: Mysql

Codey

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Nathan

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Jonathan Gardner

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL.

Having used Oracle for many, many years, I highly recommend against using it for anything, unless you like wasting money on downtime and DBAs.

AlexT

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Matt L

November 23rd, 2009

MySQL

Amanda

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

AndrewJ

November 23rd, 2009

MS SQL

Anxo

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Anthony

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Chris Schaffer

November 23rd, 2009

Vote:MySql

Chris Schaeffer

November 23rd, 2009

Vote:MySql
typed to fast

Josh

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Evan Jones

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

daBayrus

November 23rd, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Suman

November 23rd, 2009

MySQL

orn

November 23rd, 2009

Vote:mysql

Lee Smith

November 24th, 2009

Besides being open source, PostgreSQL and MySQL both have advantages.

Sipmaster

November 24th, 2009

Vote: Oracle

Compeek

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

CongThinh

November 24th, 2009

For the huge database for big projects I use MS SQL. So MySQL is a light DBMS, it’s more popular than others.

Vote: MySQL.

Tobias Hanika

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Steven Bradley

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

In all fairness, though it’s the only RDMS I have enough real experience with to judge.

Jonathan

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

bguz

November 24th, 2009

Vote: Mysql

Guy Redwood

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Ali

November 24th, 2009

Vote: Oracle

Lode

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

on a sideline: i’m an OSX user too

linh

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

mila

November 24th, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Ciprian

November 24th, 2009

So far I’ve been using MySQL for both small websites and huge enterprise applications, so I would say MySQL can fit any db requirements. If it doesn’t, than my might consider using something like CouchDB (move to something non-relational).

hatma

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Dewa

November 24th, 2009

Vote : MySQL

Sula

November 24th, 2009

Vote : MySQL

sylv3rblade

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

sudan

November 24th, 2009

my vote : MySQL

Tairone

November 24th, 2009

Vote: Oracle

mohamadreza

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MS SQL Server

dmaster97

November 24th, 2009

Vote:MS SQL Server

on task to task basis, every rdms has it’s advantages.
but overall, nothing bested MS SQL Server for price, feature, install base, support service and comunities. it has full range of product from the lightweight SQL Express to the heavy duty. It even have pretty management tools as default.

Altough i rarely use SQL Server for my projects. Some features are just not there yet in MySQL or PostGre.
as for oracle, too expensive on products and services, too much burden on resource, but it is a beast on its own.
I’m just being practical as LAMP is a common standard for low cost app server and almost every hosting provide it.

hey, there are free lunchs. but you must take as granted.

Noor Khemji

November 24th, 2009

Oracle

dmaster97

November 24th, 2009

update: MySQL must use InnoDB engine to be considered Relational DBMS.
default MyISAM engine practically only save data to indexed table(s).

what did you guys referring with MySQL? MyISAM or InnoDB?

;)

Tomáš Bílek

November 24th, 2009

PostgreSQL

Nathanael

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Christopher

November 24th, 2009

MySQL of course.

Isaac

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Khaz

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

ginghee

November 24th, 2009

Vote:Oracle

Eduardo

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Rus Mihai

November 24th, 2009

Vote: Postgre SQL

Amazing

November 24th, 2009

MS SQL Server 2008

Chris G

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MSSQL

Although, I agree w/ Maxx. It really depends on the application. Even within organizations I believe many use a variety of RDMS depending on what project they’re trying to tackle.

Chris

November 24th, 2009

MySQL

Stefano

November 24th, 2009

Vote: postgreSQL

Rodrigo Echeverría

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Florian Bogner

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

John Langlois

November 24th, 2009

Free: MySQL

Mission Critical: DB2 with pureScale

Aijaz

November 24th, 2009

Vote: PostgreSQL

Steven Melendez

November 24th, 2009

Correction to above: MS SQL Server… I wrote management studio because I am currently working in it… sleepy as well :)

Pedro Morgado

November 24th, 2009

Sql Server

hanunk

November 24th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Alex C.

November 25th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

David Rynearson

November 25th, 2009

Vote: MySQL, cause it’s free :D

Bilal Çınarlı

November 25th, 2009

vote: Oracle
using: MySQL

Pedro Valentim

November 25th, 2009

vote: Microsoft SQL Server

Edison A. Leon

November 25th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

David

November 25th, 2009

SQLServer

David

November 25th, 2009

Vote:SQLServer

razvantim

November 25th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Scott

November 25th, 2009

Vote: Oracle

Shea

November 25th, 2009

Vote: MySQL FTW

James

November 25th, 2009

Vote: MSSQL

Giulia

November 26th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Daniyal

November 26th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Dennis Winter

November 27th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

expressions

November 27th, 2009

MS SQL SERVER 2008
For web developer with smaller projects and less feature requirements MySQL might suffice.

gilles lucato

November 27th, 2009

Vote: PcSoft Windev
French IDE containing the fastest DB ever!

etter

November 27th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Yuvaraj

November 28th, 2009

Oracle

Igor

November 28th, 2009

Vote: Oracle

Ishank badhani

November 28th, 2009

one more vote for MySQL

Cody

November 28th, 2009

Vote: mySQL

Amit Singh

November 28th, 2009

Vote: SQL Server 2008

Jasem

November 29th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

onnes

November 29th, 2009

MySQL

Roland Shield

November 29th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

faLco

November 29th, 2009

Vote: Oracle

Sascha

November 29th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Joe Fox

November 29th, 2009

Vote: Microsoft SQL Server

Caveat: preferably 2005 or higher. They’ve (M$) made significant improvements in this version to performance and overall usability. I’m pretty impressed with it. I’ve worked with Oracle and dabbled a bit with MySQL, but PostgreSQL is not in my skills set yet — any motivation to add it? If not, I’ll skip it for now and stay up with the current moneymaker for me.

TBOINGTON

November 30th, 2009

Vote:WINDEV

yv

November 30th, 2009

vote : HyperFileSQL

viya

November 30th, 2009

vote : HyperFileSQL

TSL

November 30th, 2009

HyperFile SQL Client server
It’s free without limitations and easy to administer..

julien

November 30th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

greg

November 30th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

Alex

November 30th, 2009

Vote: SQL Server (2005+)

Ryan

November 30th, 2009

Vote : MySQL

SF Studio

November 30th, 2009

Vote: postgreSQL

alan

November 30th, 2009

Vote: SqlBuddy

alan

November 30th, 2009

Ups.. sorry that was: Vote: MySQL

Ben

November 30th, 2009

Vote: MySQL

PaKeR

December 1st, 2009

Vote: Oracle