How to Design a Space Futuristic Gallery Layout in Photoshop

Jul 16 2009 by Richard Carpenter | 44 Comments

How to Design a Space Futuristic Gallery Layout in Photoshop

In this web design tutorial, you’ll find a way to create a 3D space/futuristic gallery layout with Photoshop. We cover several methods such as drawing with the Rectangular Marquee Tool and using the Perspective Transform Tool.

Update

Editor’s note (Jacob Gube): I’m sorry to announce that the second part of this tutorial won’t be published. We had quality concerns with the second part of this tutorial series. We attempted to fix the second tutorial but couldn’t get it to a point where I was comfortable in publishing it on the site. In the future, I’ll more thoroughly review, test, debug and ensure follow-up tutorials are publishable before I publish the first part of the tutorial.

This two-part tutorial series will show you how to create the layout in Photoshop, and then how to convert the design into a fully functional web template that uses standards-based HTML/CSS and jQuery in the second part.

Download the source file

Feel free to download the source file so that you can study it, though we encourage you to hold off on doing so until you complete the tutorial so that you can compare your work with the provided Photoshop file.

Final result

Below, you’ll see a preview of the design we hope to achieve in the end. Click on the image to view the full-scale version of the 3D space/futuristic image gallery.

Final result

Let’s begin the tutorial, shall we?

Setting up the Photoshop canvas

1 Let’s setup our working area. Create a new Photoshop document, File > New (Ctrl + N) with width of 955px and a height of 600px.

Setting up the Photoshop canvas

2 In the Layers Panel, choose your Background layer, and fill your background layer via Edit > Fill (Shift + F5). Use a color value of #2E2E2E.

Creating the floor of the gallery

3 Create a layer on top of the Background layer.

4 Choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) from the Tools Panel and create a rectangular selection with a width of 816px and a height of 60px. If you want, to make this precise selection easier, under the Rectangular Marquee Tool options, under Style, choose Fixed Size and set the appropriate width and height values.

5 Fill in your rectangular selection with a white (#FFFFFF) color using Edit > Fill (Shift + F5). View the following figure to check your work.

Creating the floor of the gallery

6 Now, we’ll add a gradient overlay on the white rectangle. To do so, we’ll add it as layer style. Right-click on the white rectangle layer in the Layers Panel, and then choose Blending Options to open the Layer Styles dialog box.

7 Check the box beside Gradient Overlay to add the layer style, and use the values shown in the following figure.

Creating the floor of the gallery

8 With our layer styles in place, we’ll alter the rectangle’s perspective. Choose Edit > Transform > Distort. This will display transform controls around the rectangle; using the top and middle transform controls, alter the perspective by dragging the controls on the canvas. Use the following figure as a guide on how to alter the perspective.

Creating the floor of the gallery

9 Create a marquee selection around the transformed rectangle by holding down the Ctrl key and then clicking on it’s layer’s thumbnail in the Layers Panel. Doing so should load a marquee selection around the object (as shown in the following figure).

Creating the floor of the gallery

10 Create a new selection that will contain the stroke around the selection. Use Edit > Stroke to add a black stroke around the selection. Use the settings in the following figure, with a black color (#000000).

Creating the floor of the gallery

11 Choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) from the Tools Panel and create a selection around the rectangle, but leave out the bottom border. Check out the following figure as a guide on how to make this selection.

Creating the floor of the gallery

12 Delete the borders/stroke by choosing Edit > Clear or pressing the Del key. This will leave just the bottom border (which is what we want).

13 Choose the layer with the bottom border in your Layers Panel, and add a Gradient Overlay layer style by double-clicking on the layer’s thumbnail or right-clicking on it, and then choosing Blending Options to open up the Layer Style dialog box. Use the values in the following figure.

Creating the floor of the gallery

14 Check your work, you should have something like the following figure.

Creating the floor of the gallery

15 Directly underneath your 1-pixel bottom border, make a rectangular selection using the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M). Make the selection such that it spans the entire width of the bottom border, and have a height of about 10px. Use the following figure as a guide on how to create this selection.

Creating the floor of the gallery

16 Use Edit > Fill (Shift + F5) to fill the selection with a color of #9B9B9B.

17 Check your work, it should look like the following figure.

Creating the floor of the gallery

Making the walls of the gallery

18 Now, we’re going to create the sides of our 3D space/futuristic gallery. Choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) from your Tools Panel, and create a selection on the left-hand side of the floor, using the subsequent figure as a guide on how to create this selection.

Creating the floor of the gallery

19 Create a new layer on top of the floor layer. Fill in the selection with any color using Edit > Fill (Shift + F5).

20 Click on the floor layer while holding down the Ctrl key to load a selection around it.

21 Make sure that the active layer is the newly created layer on Step 19. Invert the selection you made from Step 20 using Select > Inverse (Shift + Ctrl + I).

22 Delete the area underneath the inverted selection using Edit > Clear or by pressing the Del key.

23 To make sure you did the preceding steps correctly, check your work against the subsequent figure.

Creating the floor of the gallery

24 Now, we’ll add a Gradient Overlay layer style on the left wall layer. Double-click on the layer’s thumbnail to open up the Layer Styles dialog box. Use the following figure as a guide on how to set the options and values of the Gradient Overlay.

Creating the floor of the gallery

25 Now, we add a stroke to the left-hand wall, just as we did with the floor. Load a selection around your wall by clicking its layer’s thumbnail in the Layers Panel whilst holding down the Ctrl key on the keyboard.

26 Create a new layer above your wall layer. On this new layer, Choose Edit > Stroke to add a stroke using the same settings as in Step 10.

27 Add a Color Overlay layer style by double-clicking on the layer to open up the Layer Style dialog box. Use the following figure as a guide on how to adjust the settings of the color overlay, use #808080 as the color.

Creating the floor of the gallery

28 Just like the floor, we remove some parts of the border we created but this time, we only remove the bottom and right border stroke. See the following figure to preview what we’ll be doing in the succeeding steps.

Creating the floor of the gallery

29 First, create a new layer on top of all the other layers thus far. On the left-hand side of the wall, choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) to create a 10px wide selection from the top to the bottom of the frame (see the figure below as a guide).

Space Futuristic tutorial image

30 Choose Edit > Fill to fill in the newly created selection with a gray color (#9B9B9B). You should have something like the following figure.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

31 Repeat Steps 18 – 30 for the right-hand side wall, but, to keep our lighting and shadow accurate, when adding the gradient overlay shown on Step 24, use 180 degrees as the Angle value (see the following figure).

Space Futuristic tutorial image

32 Make sure that you’re keeping up by checking your work against the following figure.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Adding inset dividers onto the floor

33 We will divide the floor panel into several sections; when we place our images on here later on, they’ll help delineate each thumbnail image. To start, choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) from the Tools Panel and create a tall 1px wide selection on top of the floor of our space/futuristic 3D gallery. The height of the selection isn’t important – just make sure that it’s significantly taller than the floor of image gallery.

34 Create a new layer. With your 1px wide marquee selection still active, fill in the area using Edit > Fill (Shift + F5) with a shade of gray (#D6D6D6).

35 With the selection still active, move the 1px wide selection 1px to the right using your right arrow key. Fill in this area beneath the selection with a shade of gray, #B8B8B8.

36 See if you did the previous steps correctly by checking your work against the following figure.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

37 Duplicate this 2px line into another layer. Do to so, with the current layer still active in the Layers Panel, switch to the Move Tool (V) in the Tools Panel. Hold down the Alt key, and then press the right arrow key. This will duplicate the line into another layer, moved to the right by 1px (or your default movement increment).

38 Now, we’ll move this duplicated line to the right about 100px. To do so, still with the Move Tool (V) active, hold down the Shift key and press the right arrow key 10 times; with the Shift key held down, the movement increment should change from only 1px to 10px.

39 We create more inset dividers by repeating Steps 37 – 38. When you’re done, you should end up with something like the following figure. Notice how all the lines have the same gap/spacing in between them. Also, notice that the gap/space between the left wall and the first divider, and the right wall and the last divider is equal.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

40 Let’s tidy up a bit by merging all of the inset divider layers. Do so by right-clicking on the topmost layer and choosing Merge Down (Ctrl + E). Keep merging down until you only have one layer for all the inset dividers.

41 Now, we’ll transform the perspective of our inset dividers so that they follow the 3D orientation of our gallery. Choose Edit > Transform > Perspective, and drag the top-right transform control inwards. Use the following figure as a guide on how to transform the perspective of our inset dividers.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

42 Load a selection around your floor (again) by holding down the Ctrl key and clicking on the layer’s thumbnail in the Layers Panel.

43 Switch back to your inset divider layer, make sure it’s the active layer in the Layers Panel.

44 Invert the current selection by choosing Select > Inverse (Shift + Ctrl + I).

45 Delete the area underneath the inverted selection by choosing Edit > Clear or hitting the Del key. This removes the excess parts of the inset dividers (see the following figure on how they should look like now).

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Creating the background of the gallery

46 First create a new layer underneath all of the layers thus far (a layer above the Background layer).

47 Choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) from the Tools Panel and make a selection on the newly created layer, using the following figure as a guide on how to make the selection.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

48 With the selection created, fill the area underneath the selection by choosing Edit > Fill (Shift + F5); use any color because we’ll be adding a gradient overlay that will cover up any color you choose.

49 Open up the Layer Styles dialog box to add a Gradient Overlay; do so by double-clicking on the layer’s thumbnail. The left color stop of the color gradient is a gray color (#9B9B9B) and the right color stop of the gradient has a slightly lighter shade of gray (#D5D5D5). View the subsequent figure to see what settings should be used for this gradient overlay.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

50 Confirm with the following figure that you’re still on track, you should have something like this:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Making the rounded windows on the background of the gallery

51 We’ll make it look like there are windows you can look out of. Create a new layer on top of the gallery’s background. Choose the Elliptical Marquee Tool from the Tools Panel (or if you want, choose the Ellipse Tool instead). Create a perfect circle by holding down the Shift key whilst dragging the Elliptical Marquee Tool onto the canvas.

52 Choose Edit > Fill (Shift + F5) to fill in the circle with any color; it doesn’t matter what color you choose because we’re going to put something on top of it very soon.

53 Create a new layer and then make another circle beside the other one you just created, making it identical to the other one. Alternatively, just duplicate the other layer (by right-clicking on it, and then choosing Duplicate Layer) and then use the Move Tool (V) to position it accordingly. You should have something like the following figure now.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

54 To make our gallery look like it’s in outer space, we’ll use a stock image provided by
James Oliver of deviantArt called: Earth. Go over to the Earth page and copy the image to your clip board.

55 Create a selection around the first circle by holding down the Ctrl key and then clicking on its layer’s thumbnail.

56 Paste the image from your clipboard into the circular marquee selection by choosing Edit > Paste Into (Ctrl + Shift + V).

57 Choose the Move Tool (V) from your Tools Panel and use your mouse to position the background inside the window (for more precise movements, use your arrow key).

Space Futuristic tutorial image

58 Repeat the two previous steps for the right window.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

59 By performing the above steps, you’ll notice that there are now layer masks on top of each circle layer. Right-click on the layer’s mask, and then choose Apply Mask.

60 Create a marquee selection around the entire Photoshop canvas by choosing Select > All (Ctrl + A).

61 Now, choose Edit > Crop to crop the canvas to the selection. Doing this gets rid of any parts of the stock photo hiding beyond the edge of our Photoshop canvas.

62On our circle/window layers, we’ll add two layer styles: Inner Shadow and Stroke. See the following figures for the settings of these layer styles.

The following figure displays the settings for the Inner Shadow layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

The following figure displays the settings for the Stroke layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Adding a shine to the windows for realism

63 Using the Elliptical Marquee Tool (or the Ellipse Tool), create a perfect circle inside one of our circular windows (hold down the Shift key).

64 Create a new layer, and with the new selection still active, choose Edit > Fill (Shift + F5) and fill the area underneath the selection with a white color (#FFFFFF).

65 Add a layer mask by clicking on the Add layer mask icon on the bottom of the Layers Panel.

66 Choose the Gradient Tool from the Tools Panel, and make sure that the gradient style is set to Linear Gradient in its Options bar.

67 With your mouse, apply the linear gradient on the layer mask from the bottom of the circle to about halfway of the circle.

68 Lower the opacity of this layer to suit your tastes.

69 Repeat Steps 63 – 68 for the other circular window. This should add a shine on the windows, to make them look realistic (see the following figure to check up on your work thus far).

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Creating inset dividers in between the circular windows

70 We are now going to add vertical and horizontal inset dividers onto our gallery background so that the background looks like they’re panels on a futuristic spaceship. To start, choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) from the Tools Panel.

71 With the Rectangular Marquee Tool chosen, create similar inset dividers that we did earlier in the tutorial: as a refresher, head back up to Steps 33 – 36 under a previous section called " Adding inset dividers onto the floor". Use the following example as a guide.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

72 Create the first line vertically, in the middle of the two circular windows. Then, create another line horizontally. You should have something like the following figure.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Sealing up our 3D space/futuristic gallery

73 We are now going to close up our room around the edges so that it looks like a real room. To start, choose the Rounded Rectangle Tool from the Tools Panel. In the Options bar of the Rounded Rectangle Tool, set the Radius value to 15px.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

74 Create the rounded rectangle shape onto the canvas such that it covers the entire room area. Notice that in the following figure, the rounded corners hang over a bit to the left and right.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

75 Create a new layer and fill in the rounded rectangle with any color, it doesn’t matter what color you choose because it’ll be covered up layer styles.

76 On our rounded rectangle layer, we’re going to add four layer styles: a Drop Shadow, a Bevel and Emboss, a Color Overlay, and a Stroke. Please refer to the subsequent figures to get the settings that should be applied for each layer style.

The following figure is for the Drop Shadow layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

The following figure is for the Bevel and Emboss layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

The following figure is for the Color Overlay layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

The following figure is for the Stroke layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

77 We’ll finish the gallery’s edge. First, create a marquee selection around your rounded rectangle layer by holding down the Ctrl key and then clicking on the layer’s thumbnail; this will load the appropriate selection.

78 Next, we shrink the marquee selection by choosing Select > Modify > Contract. We contract the selection by 8 pixels.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

79 Now, we delete the area underneath the contracted marquee selection by choosing Edit > Clear or pressing the Del key. After deleting the selected area, see if your work resembles the following figure.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Adding shadows to the gallery for realistic lighting effects

80 We want to make our lighting and shadows as realistic as possible to really give the design a three-dimensional look. To start, choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool from the Tools Panel and create a rectangular selection using the following figure as a guide.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

81 Next, create a new layer underneath the gallery’s border, but above all of the other layers.

82 Set your foreground color in the Tools Panel to black (#000000).

83 Choose the Gradient Tool from the Tools Panel, and in the Options bar, choose the Foreground to Transparent color gradient, and choose Linear Gradient as the gradient style.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

84 Make sure the marquee selection you made on Step 80 is still there, and also that the active layer on the Layers Panel is the newly-created layer. Create the linear gradient by dragging your mouse from the top of the gallery, to the bottom, and inside toward the middle of the marquee selection.

85  Lower the opacity of this layer down to the about 60%. This layer is now our shadow layer. Check the following figure to see if you were able to create the shadow accurately.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Designing the left and right arrow buttons

86 The images in our gallery will move left and right. To allow the user to move through the image thumbnails, we’ll need to give them left and right controls. To start, create a small circle on the left side and on top of your rounded rectangle border layer using the Elliptical Marquee Tool in the Tools Panel.

87 Fill the circle with any color by choosing Edit > Fill (Shift + F5).

88 Now, we’ll add four layer styles: a Drop Shadow, a Bevel and Emboss, and Gradient Overlay, and a Stroke. Refer to the subsequent figures for the settings of these layer styles.

The following figure shows the settings for the Drop Shadow layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

The following figure shows the settings for the Bevel and Emboss layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

The following figure shows the settings for the Gradient Overlay layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

The following figure shows the settings for the Stroke layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

89 Check your work against the following figure; it should look something like this:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

90 Now, we’ll add a leftward pointing arrow onto it. We do this by using the Custom Shape Tool in the Tools Panel. In the Options bar, choose Arrow 9 under Shape.

91 To create the right arrow, we simply duplicate the circle layer and the arrow custom shape layers. First, choose both layers in the Layers Panel by holding down Ctrl while clicking on each layer. Then, right-click on the Layers Panel and choose, Duplicate Layers.

92 With the duplicated layers still the active layers in the Layers Panel, choose Edit > Transform > Flip Horizontal to reorient the layers to point to the right.

93 With the Move Tool (V), move the rightward pointing arrow across the room, to the opposite of the leftward pointing arrow.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

Creating the gallery’s thumbnails

94 Choose the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) from the Tools Panel, create a new layer, and then create a square inside the room.

95 Fill this marquee selection with any color by choosing Edit > Fill (Shift + F5).

Space Futuristic tutorial image

96 Now, we’ll apply two layer styles onto the thumbnail layer: a Gradient Overlay and a Stroke. Use the following figures as a guide on the layer styles’ settings.
The following figure displays the settings for the Gradient Overlay layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

The following figure displays the settings for the Stroke layer style:

Space Futuristic tutorial image

97 Check your image thumbnail container to see if it looks like the following figure.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

98 Duplicate this layer twice, and then use the Move Tool (V) to move them across the room. In the following figure, I used the Horizontal Type Tool (T) to add text into it.

Space Futuristic tutorial image

We’re done!

If you managed to follow along, give yourself a pat on the back – that was one long tutorial, wouldn’t you say?

The final result

If everything went well, this is what your web layout should look like. Click on the image below to see the full-scale version of the 3D space/futuristic image gallery.

Final result

Stay tuned for Part 2: making a jQuery-powered image gallery!

In the follow-up tutorial, which we hope to post next week, I’ll be showing you how to convert this image gallery layout into a fully functional HTML/CSS template, which we will then animate with the help of jQuery.

To make sure you don’t miss the follow up tutorial, you have to subscribe to the Six Revisions RSS feed, which will let you know as soon as the follow-up tutorial is posted!

The "Space Futuristic Gallery" Tutorial series

This two-part tutorial series will show you how to create the layout in Photoshop, and then how to convert the design into a fully functional web template that uses standards-based HTML/CSS and jQuery in the second part.

Post your questions in the comments

If you found any trouble, difficulty, or errors in the tutorial – please leaves us a note in the comments – we’ll try to help you the best way we can!

Related content

About the Author

Richard Carpenter is a freelance Web and Graphic Designer from England. Check out his portfolio here.

44 Comments

09

July 17th, 2009

That looks so sick. You did a really great job. Good work.

Design

July 17th, 2009

Nice Tutorial.

Thanks

Stefan

July 17th, 2009

hey,

sorry but to me, this looks really ugly and the 3d effect is absolutely useless. But even worse is the planet earth in the window of this “gallery space craft”.

Metin

July 17th, 2009

This is truly and utterly nuts!
Great work Richard.

richard

July 17th, 2009

Thx for the comments

Zany17

July 17th, 2009

WOW’eeeeeeeee … what an amazing tutorial.

Thanks for sharing this with us, Richard. I think i’m going to design a UI based on this exact 3D effect for one of my next projects (of course, done entirely by me, using just your tutorial as an inspiration – not the psd source).

PS. That’s a very clean website you got there … me like it a lot. You can add me to your watchers list :)

Roberto

July 17th, 2009

Excellent tutorial! Thanks!

samuel pushpak

July 17th, 2009

Just awesome..
If some JQuery is added and is made functional.. It will really become an interesting plugin!!

samuel pushpak

July 17th, 2009

waiting for the next article..
awesome job Mr.Richard Carpenter.. I appreciate your efforts..

Stephanie

July 17th, 2009

This was a great tutorial! I learned a lot while I worked through it. Thanks!

What font did you use for the “Image Gallery – small image gallery” text at the top?

BryanRegencia.com

July 17th, 2009

Good stuff! Thanks for the sharing.

richard

July 18th, 2009

Thank for all your comments.

@stephanie, the font is “swatchit”

@stefan, thx for sharing your opinion with us :p

Charley

July 18th, 2009

10 Create a new selection that will contain the stroke around the selection.

Did you mean ‘Create a new layer’?

Charley

Lucas

July 18th, 2009

that was amazing dude…

Jess

July 19th, 2009

Now thats a good tutorial. pure class.

Pradeep CD

July 19th, 2009

great gallery…thanks for tut..

richard

July 19th, 2009

@charley,

make the selection around the base by clicking the layer whilst holding down the CTRL key. create a new layer then add the stroke.

jacob must of over “edited” that part, doesnt quite make senese.

Simukis

July 27th, 2009

cool design… i will use it for my error pages :)

Jarod Billingslea

July 27th, 2009

I think the boxes should have shadows under them, it seems more appealing to me.

Webjohn01

August 12th, 2009

Jacob! I would like to suggest can you have an interview with Richard Carpenter?

nemo1112

August 15th, 2009

Simple but amazing. I love your tutorial.

Darron

August 16th, 2009

great tutorial and effects as usual. this is how those joomla sites make those movable ajax carousels i suppose.

DehLonghi

August 18th, 2009

Great tutorial, check my outcome, made some improvements !
http://twitpic.com/eeei1

Arun

August 25th, 2009

i love all tutorials by carpenter. and this one is awesome. can i use this gallery in one of my projects. pls reply
:P

Jacob Gube

August 25th, 2009

@Arun: Rich was gracious enough to release the source as GPL-style, so feel free to use the Photoshop design on your own work.

Chris

August 25th, 2009

Wonderful!
And when is part 2 coming?
:-)

Jacob Gube

August 25th, 2009

@Chris: Part 2 is long overdue, I apologize for that. Richard and I are troubleshooting some issues with the tutorial write-up of Part 2 – and we hope to have it out very soon. Thanks for your patience Chris.

fanhua

November 11th, 2009

study it,thank you very much!

Sandra

November 28th, 2009

How is part two coming along? Much anticapating part2.

Best,

Sandra

0lli

November 29th, 2009

… I guess there will never be a “Part 2″ !

so sad !

frozen_flame

January 16th, 2010

your sick man..you are really awesome!

Beqaaa

February 22nd, 2010

Oooooh! it’s Wonderful work for us… thanks Richard :*

Shai Perednik

June 3rd, 2010

Thanks for the tutorial. I hope for part 2 you’ll use some simple folder scheme like this one used on codrops, http://tympanus.net/codrops/2010/05/23/fresh-sliding-thumbnails-gallery-with-jquery-php/.

What makes it particulary simple is just having an images folder, and each folder under that is an album. Makes adding new photos dead simple. And using a description file, you can give each image a title and description in the gallery.

dado

June 23rd, 2010

hey,
tutorial is amazing.
Thanks Richard .

Atranaz

July 14th, 2010

its a fine tuts but one thing is missing when you create a wall & floor lines & some shadow effects you didn’t mention the proper instructions like didn’t mention wall height it give v-bad shape of my gallery :)
waiting for other tuts
thanks :)

Mehdi

August 11th, 2010

i loooooooooooooooooooove you richard

edistizu

August 12th, 2010

Sure,
it does look good and it´s done well,like the final result, but i think you will have a problem with the coding part, because it makes no sense: Where are the pictures going to go when the left or right buttons are clicked.There are walls on each side, so i don´t know how you imagined the whole moving process to take place.
Maybe if there is a plug-in outthere to emulate the teleport effect seen in star trek(but i doubt it) that you could use,since this is a futuristic gallery . . .

Vaibhav

January 29th, 2011

Thanks,Where is the second part?

Tia

June 7th, 2011

i loved it……

Golam Rahaman

October 31st, 2011

wow! nice tutorial. very clean and eye caching 3D space/futuristic image gallery.

Kaimanblues

December 14th, 2011

Great tut……….tks, so much
but the second ?

Magdalena

March 9th, 2012

“make the selection around the base by clicking the layer whilst holding down the CTRL key. create a new layer then add the stroke.

jacob must of over “edited” that part, doesnt quite make senese.”
Oh, yes Richard so true, I am a young designer and I am stuck on this one :(

MarMar

June 6th, 2012

when i Delete the borders/stroke by choosing Edit > Clear
the whole Rectangular deleted! i want to know how can deleted the stroke from left,right,top sides? thanks for the great job

ghostdog

November 19th, 2012

dude where is part 2 ……O M G NNNNnnnnnnn..oooooooooo!

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