Top 10 Flash Content Management Systems

Jun 26 2010 by Tatiana Titkova | 33 Comments

Top 10 Flash Content Management Systems

When it comes to Flash, there are some conflicting views. There is a misconception that that Flash web pages are not seen by search engines and can’t be indexed at all. Others reckon that Flash sites are not user-friendly and load for ages.

If you are one of those individuals who’ve overlooked and ignored Flash as a viable CMS, I hope this post will make you look twice.

1. FlashMoto Flash CMS

FlashMoto Flash CMS

FlashMoto Flash CMS Demo

FlashMoto is an advanced Flash content management system that allows users to create fully editable, extensible and SEO-friendly Flash websites and easily manage them. FlashMoto is intended for Flash developers, freelancers and design studios that are engaged in creating custom Flash sites or modifying web templates. It provides an opportunity to create a website of any complexity, starting from an online business card to a full-fledged portfolio.

So far, there is no way to create multiple accounts for the CMS. In theory, FlashMoto allows the replacement of one template by another (but profound Flash skills required).

System Requirements

  • PHP 5.2+
  • Zend Optimizer v3.3 and higher

Pricing

The standalone version of FlashMoto CMS costs $199, while one template + CMS costs around $250.

2. Royale/CMS

Royale/CMS

Royale/CMS Demo

Royale CMS is a rebrandable content management system created by an interactive agency for agencies and freelancers. With this CMS, you may create the structure that fits your design. They make an emphasis on the rebranding feature: users may upload their own logo and change the colors. Royale CMS is specifically designed for websites that typically use external XML data.

System Requirements

  • Apache 2 (or higher) with mod_rewrite
  • PHP 5.2 with GD library 2 (or higher)
  • MySQL 5.1 (or higher)

Pricing

One license costs $199.

3. Saffron Flash CMS

Saffron Flash CMS

Saffron Video Tour

Saffron CMS is a WYISWYG content management system for Flash-based websites. It is a set of seven readymade components and a controller component that can be incorporated into a Flash-based website and the website content can be updated without leaving the browser window.

System Requirements

  • Adobe/Macromedia Flash MX/MX 2004/8, or Flash CS3 (Windows or Mac)
  • ActionScript 2.0

Pricing

Saffron CMS costs $129.00.

4. fCMSPro

fCMSPro

fCMSPro Screencast

fCMSPro is a Flash component from Flashloaded. It is a solid Flash content management system that provides a lot of useful features for fast and easy Flash website management. Like any other CMS, it makes it possible for users to update content directly on a live website. Websites created with fCMSPro are search-engine-friendly.

System Requirements

  • Adobe/Macromedia Flash 8, Flash CS3+
  • Flash Player 8, 9 or 10
  • ActionScript 2.0
  • PHP version 4.3.0 or higher
  • MySQL 4.1.1 or higher

Pricing

fCMSPro costs $ 299 (per website).

5. Yooba CMS

Yooba CMS

Yooba CMS Live Demo

Yooba is one of the convenient Flash content management systems that allow users to create rich-media content without having to be a programmer. The user interface looks and works just like any application installed on your computer. Yooba comes in two different account types: Professional (monthly subscription) and Enterprise (annual subscription).

System Requirements

As hosting is included, you don’t have to worry about the system requirements.

Pricing

Yooba price depends on the account type and subscription period.

6. Flashblocks

Flashblocks

Flashblocks Live Demo

Flashblocks is a simple Flash content management system aimed mostly at Flash designers. It provides easy ways to create, update, and arrange Flash content from any web browser.

System Requirements

  • Flash MX, 8, CS3, CS4 or CS5
  • ActionScript 2.0
  • PHP 4-6 on the server and GD2.0 for image processing

Pricing

Flashblocks initially costs $240 with additional licenses being substantially less.

7. FlashContentManager

FlashContentManager

FlashContentManager Demo

FlashContentManager is a simple File Manager developed for Flash websites with external content that allows users to update text, images, SWFs, MP3s, etc. directly on a live website. It is aimed at both Flash designers and end-users.

System Requirements

  • PHP enabled server
  • GD extension in PHP

Pricing

FlashContentManager costs €50.

8. Flypaper

Flypaper

Flypaper Demo (Registration Needed)

The Flypaper Platform was designed specifically for agencies and companies that create and use interactive content. Non-technical users can create content without Flash skills and programming knowledge.

System Requirements

  • Windows 7, Windows Vista or Windows XP (Service Pack 2 and above)
  • 1GHz Pentium processor or higher (2GHz, dual core processor recommended)
  • 2 GB of RAM (4 GB recommended)
  • Adobe Flash Player version 9.0.115.0 or later (included)
  • Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (*install .NET before installing Flypaper*)

Pricing

The price depends on the subscription type and the number of modules available.

9. Maki CMS

Maki

Maki CMS Demo

Maki is another simple content management system that allows users to build and update Flash-based websites. Maki provides a range of readymade templates that you choose and customize.

System Requirements

There are no system requirements as all Maki CMS websites are hosted on their server.

Pricing

The price (€164–€406) depends on the subscription type.

10. Flint CMS

Flint CMS

Flint CMS is a simple Flash content editor that can be integrated into your own content management solution. It can be used with the news manager, product catalog or anything else.

System Requirements

  • PHP server
  • GD plugin

Pricing

The site license costs €49.

Related Content

About the Author

Tatiana Titkova is a copywriter/marketing specialist interested in web design, development, SEO, and SEM/SMO currently working for FlashMoto.com – an advanced Flash content management system provider. You may connect with her on Twitter.

33 Comments

Patrick Naughton

June 26th, 2010

It still leaves the question of whether the SEO additions will be enough for the websites to actually get ranked on a high level.

Jordan

June 26th, 2010

Seriously? Why would you jump on the Flash CMS wagon now? Decimating the user experience of your entire site—especially for mobile users—just so that you can have custom scroll bars or a flashy slide show is just dumb. With the advances in CSS3, paired with jQuery, I think that entire sites built in flash are a thing of the past.

tl;dr: Learn HTML5, CSS3 and jQuery. Don’t waste your time on flash (for web development).

Brian Altenhofel

June 26th, 2010

Drupal can also power Flash websites. A good example can be seen at monodesign (dot) co (dot) uk.

Sekler

June 26th, 2010

You are so wrong, my friend. Flash is where quality begins.

JG

June 26th, 2010

I agree with the first two comments.

Unless you already have high enough brand awareness or visibility, in which case SEO doesn’t matter, avoid these flash sites.

Exactly HOW are these sites search-engine friendly? Are they building a duplicate HTML site alongside the Flash site?

Unless you’re doing something experimental, I just don’t see the point of creating an entire site in flash…

gday

June 26th, 2010

I’m not a Flash-hater, actually enjoy working with it.
But this just feels so wrong…

nick

June 26th, 2010

jordan – flash based websites do generally suck, are inaccessible to mobile users and crash easily, but some clients just know what they want, and if they want a flash based website, no matter what, this is a perfect answer. also, nice website, I remember seeing that layouts photoshop tutorial online somewhere

aristophrenia

June 27th, 2010

Thanks Jordan – why dont you learn something about the industry ?

Flash is by far, far and away the best tool for rich media. If you are coding in html and jQuery you are and absolute pleb.

Your position is you want to eradicate something with ten years of incredibly rich internet so you can introduce something which emulates it – and emulates it poorly.

HTML on phones is significantly worse for compatibility than the nightmare we already have with desktop – yet with flash we can develop to desktop, phone, TV, in car systems etc.

Which part of a richer fuller more engaging internet do you hate ? Do you want to stick with static text and images ? If you like jQuery you must like rich internet – and if that is the case – HTML and Javascript (the poorest coding language on the planet) are simply pathetic.

I’ve been developing for digital media for almost 20 years – Im sure you are young and naive – why dont you learn how to use flash and then comment.
Grow up son.

Mike

June 27th, 2010

I wonder how they make these Flash CMS because it’s so awesome to me :) Especially Flash Moto CMS. They impress me right away when I see their website.

kaniadona

June 27th, 2010

not free…….
BAD

Tanya

June 27th, 2010

I must say good job to find 10 flash CMS because I didn’t even know about one before reading this article. Thnx for sharing this.

Jordan Byrd

June 27th, 2010

@nick: yeah it’s an old site, I’m working on a rebuild. I had to get something simple up in a weekend and didn’t have a month to burn. I like the new design better, but it’s not quite ready to take live yet. And I understand picky clients; I spent a couple months building 3-4 sites in DNN for a client who was 100% positive that it was the best CMS out there. Including one with a god-awful flash banner that I had to throw together. It was a nightmare.

@aristophrenia: I love the smell of a flame war in the morning. Anyways, if you read my comment, I never said that I hate flash, I just think that people use it for things that it wasn’t intended for. And having a closed—AKA built and maintained by 1 company—standard as the most popular way to publish interactive content seems backwards. I don’t want HTML5/CSS3/Jquery to emulate flash, I want the 3 standards to mature and leave us with a more flexible, accessible internet. I don’t think that this is a particularly naive or extreme position; it’s my understanding that pretty much everybody is looking forward to the days when flash is unnecessary.

tl;dr: if you’re going to talk down to someone on the internet, learn to type. I am not “and absolute pleb”. I am an absolute pleb. Me and the other plebs take offense.

Jordan Walker

June 27th, 2010

There is definitely a premium to use a Flash based CMS, however unique as they are, an important niche to digital landscape they play.

Zach

June 27th, 2010

@aristophrenia
your being awful hard on Jordan, and awful polarized..
as for compatibility..
my moms iphone won’t load flash websites…
nor will many other systems
it is a plug-in after all

also it is my impression that being in the business for 20 years puts you at least around 40… Maybe you should give some thought to younger ideas… javascript frameworks are just picking up momentum. Especiall with HTML5 and CSS3 and all that good new stuff on the horizon, a lot of rich media that otherwise would be done in flash would be better off without it. That being said… for many applications Flash is still the best way to do it.
As for calling me a plebe for using HTML and JQuery… f&#% off!

Adam

June 27th, 2010

@Jacob Glube:
It would have been nice if you had made a more solid case for your statements (i.e., how is it a *misconception* that flash websites load long? most of them do just that!).

@aristophrenia and @jordan:
Insulting each other is the worst productive action to take (and I quote: “grow up son”).
A more helpful solution would have been to talk about why each of you think that flash is useful / a thing of the past.

Personally, I think that flash does well for some websites while completely ruining others – it always depends on the specific scenario. Some websites need rich media, others do better with simple yet effective HTML, CSS and optionally JavaScript.

Christophe de la Fabrique du Multimédia

June 28th, 2010

Flash websites may be great but are not SEO friendly. Yes search engines can read flash movie. Yes, we can include some meta in html pages that include flash files BUT that is not best practices in SEO. What about semantics, linkjuice or bot herding ? Moreover, there are serious accessibility issues with flash. By the way, theses CMS look fun to try.

Tatiana Titkova

June 28th, 2010

@ JG
Flash websites, I mean professionally done Flash websites, are also can be SEO-friendly and fully indexable by search engines. A good example is http://fcmspro.com/ – a website created on the basis of Flashloaded Flash CMS.
Brief statistics:
PR: 3
Number of pages in Google index: about 70
Yahoo links: 246
Yahoo linkdomain: 290.

Meanwhile I have created a FlashMoto based website, and right now I’m going to optimize it. As soon as I’m done, I’ll show you the result to prove that Flash websites are completely SEO-friendly.

And now asking your question:
>Exactly HOW are these sites search-engine friendly? Are they building a duplicate HTML site alongside the Flash site?

Yes, you are right. As I have a good experience working with FlashMoto, I may say that FlashMoto CMS is organized and functioning in the way that Google entirely indexes your Flash website content. The thing is Flash sites built with FlashMoto have two versions:
- Flash version (seen by users);
- HTML version (seen by search engines and users who don’t have a Flash player).

Linx

June 28th, 2010

Actually we all are a little bit tired of these debates and controversy, I guess. But who said “that entire sites built in flash are a thing of the past”?! (c) @Jordan
No one forbids you to use HTML5 and build brilliant websites with it. So please, stick to your own opinion and don’t prevent Flash professionals from creating real masterpieces using Flash technology.

Leon

June 28th, 2010

Nice roundup. I have used FlashBlocks before and I really liked it. We wrote a blogpost about it actually. It’s in Dutch though, but here’s the link to the Google Translated English version: [link]

ddeja

June 28th, 2010

Well it’s very hard to judge and review any CMS without testing it. Most of them do not allow as I could see to test them just to see the tutorials. And even if demo version is available they require my name and email address or more… why? If that’s the case than I’m out…

Good Luck.

AuroraFlash

June 29th, 2010

You know guys things are moving forward and we can not just stay with HTML. Interactivity means alot and it’s what flash is good for, if there are some certain problems with the SEO aspect I am sure they are to be solved, all we know adobe works n the issue.
I would say that the biggest problem of flash is adobe greediness. The cost of the product is unbelievable and the fact that they launch new CS 123456 every half a year is just killing me. Instead of fixing the bugs they are publishing new versions with old problems.

AuroraFlash

June 29th, 2010

Hope Microsoft kills the bastards with the Silverlight :D

Jordan

June 29th, 2010

I actually have been extremely impressed with the few silverlight apps I’ve used—especially netflix.

Anastasia

June 30th, 2010

Following up the list, I’ve been working with flash CMS templates developed by FlashMint. They are really simple and thus kinda perfect for the end user who just needs to update texts from time to time.

ChicagoWD

June 30th, 2010

There is also another great Flash CMS called Emeris Quartez. I am using it at www (d0t) mattwilborne (d0t) com

Again, it has been difficult to produce quality SEO for the website, but it is still a great Flash website and Flash CMS.

Antipitch

June 30th, 2010

No offense meant, but most of you seem more of the “SEO-specialist” or “webdesigner” type.

Trends against flash:
1. Of course, jquery, mootools et al. mimic flash’s rich media capabilities. But what’s wrong that: no plugins, broader availability, lots cheaper development, you name it…

2. HTML 5 (combined with 1): utube and the porn industry switch to html 5 for video. Not my type of thing, but let’s face it: there’s not much more to “rich media” then video and those guys set the standards.

3. iphone and -more important for full-fetched websites- the ridiculous pad will NEVER support flash.

Development for flash:
1. Real big brands/ sites you’d use flex -not flash- for development, anyway. Of course, still flash output but forget any of those cms portraied.

2. Of course, Google can partly “read” flash content as long as it is really text (flash-internally). And yes, you can have “real” URLs. There are frameworks like Gaia helping you with it. Program a bridge to your favourite cms and you’re done. Middle-size projects like 8,000 or higher I’d say…

cheers

Hregrin

July 1st, 2010

I’d like “flash fans” to have a chat with a blind internet user… Basically, the main problem with Flash is not SEO but a very interesting thing called accessibility.

Flash can be great to use for some parts of a website, banners, small apps, but please, not for content…

m@

July 1st, 2010

The flashMoto demo is pretty cool!! :D

Flash

July 2nd, 2010

@Zach

“my moms iphone won’t load flash websites…”

Zach, there are so many things wrong with your statement and comments like that can’t be taken seriously.

@Hregrin

I will have a chat with any blind internet user any time you like. I have been developing applications that need to be accessible to blind users, we use different tools to allow users with disabilities to have a great experience and this is not one thing that we test in our computer and then let out in the wild.

We have teams dedicated to test all and each are of the experience so that it is flawless and we are not worried only about blind users but also users that are not able to distinguish different shades of colors so the design goes through a tough process that enables us test the site in different light environments, accessibility environments and finally every single area of the site has to be read out loud correctly for those users who are not able to see the content properly.

——————–

I am not a HTML5 hater but when people just spit words out without thinking or having the experience with the software it makes me upset.

Yes, mom and pop’s shop may not have enough money to pay for a dedicated team to make their site accessible but please do not insult every site out there or the software itself just because its not “SEO” or has “accessible” issues.

Oh if you are curios I have built applications with Flash, Flex, JS+HTML and Silverlight along with working with different back-end technologies. I am currently creating applications for Fortune 100 companies and because of this we have to be making Flash accessible for years.

So next time you come and tell me why you hate Flash, please tell me how many Applications that serve thousands of users per hour you have made and then we can chat.

Majakovskij

July 3rd, 2010

Well maybe there’s need to edit the list.
What about XML2CMS?
http://www.xml2cms.com/xml2cms

Xml to Cms is a powerful web-app that let to turn any valid xml file into an instant content manager solution.

jasonredhawk

July 4th, 2010

Wow, I’m truly surprised how so many people have turned their backs on flash, when it’s been the foundation of what so many other applications have tried to be. without flash, most developers & designers would not be where they are today without the knowledge they’ve gained of what is possible. Flash is not on it’s way out, it will grow and adapt like any good solid software. Flash has continously adapted to meet the creative standards of the worlds greatest creative minds. Just be because their are bad flash developers/designers should in no way diminish flash as a product.

alex

August 3rd, 2010

i think many people speak without really know flash.
flash is not only for interfaces, it has many powerful features, and allow you create beatiful designs is only one of them. i think many people give a flash bad reputation. i am a developer and i know many programming languages but when i did know the flash language (as3) i did open my mouth and say this is the web language that i was looking for.
i think flash based cms are very good ideas, and is only a matter of time before people looks its power.

Bryan Grezeszak

April 26th, 2011

Some of the commenters on here need to learn flash before talking about it.

Ya know flash can be progressively enhanced actually easier than JS/HTML5 can. You literally make a div tag with your simple SEO/mobile html content, then use swfobject to embed the flash, it replaces the div content and shows the users the right stuff when it can, and people and search engines see the degraded version when they can’t. It’s even easier than noscript tags.

That’s it, 5 minutes and you’ve made your full flash website 100% degradable to work on mobiles, great for search engines, etc. Couple that with some very simple things like using SWFAddress for deeplinking and some sound design principals and you literally end up with a site that has all the animation/graphic abilities of flash, and zero of the downsides people talk about. It’s been a LOOOOOONG time since flash was a problem, keep up with the times people :)

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